Next Salon Discussion

First Tuesday current affairs discussion - Tuesday 5 December 7:00pm start

Tuesday 2nd Jan: First Tuesday Current Affairs discussion

We'll discuss two topical subjects

Theatre Reviews

Donate via PayPal

Donations to development costs of website very gratefully received

Manchester theatre reviews
PDF Print E-mail
Manchester theatre reviews

Manchester Sound: The Massacre

Manchester Sound: The Massacre by Polly Wiseman

Presented by Library Theatre, Directed by Paul Jepson

At a secret venue in the Northern Quarter

Reviewed by Fat Roland June 2013

 

Justin Bieber is on a trip. It’s a trip to the visitor’s book in Anne Frank House. He writes a comment that she “would have been a belieber”. It causes an international storm. The entire universe resolves never to mesh historical tragedy with modern pop culture ever again.

Read more...
 
PDF Print E-mail
Manchester theatre reviews

Mysterious Skin

Mysterious Skin by Prince Gomolvilas

Produced by Vertigo, Performed at Three Minute Theatre

Reviewed by Simon Belt May 2013

 

What a pleasure to return to Manchester’s Three Minute Theatre, with its welcoming and intimate atmosphere, and generally quite experimental theatrical productions. Mysterious Skin written as a stage adaptation by Prince Gomolvilas (2003), from the novel by Scott Heim (1995), and produced here by Vertigo was one such production, tests the sensibilities of the audience with a real, in your face emotional drama drawing you in and inviting you to be a part of the journey. It was also decidedly unnerving and uncomfortable viewing, so I'll try and unpick it as an experience.

 

The off beat story is based around two young men from dysfunctional families in small town America with wildly different degrees of comfort around their own sexuality. One is a rather nerdy young lad who isn't comfortable with sexual advances from a wannabe girlfriend, and the other an occassional male prostitute, seemingly very relaxed about sexual activity albeit not with women

Read more...
 
PDF Print E-mail
Manchester theatre reviews

Away From Home

Away From Home by Rob Ward and Martin Jameson

Produced by Working Progress

To be reviewed by Simon Belt Juy 2013

 

Kyle is comfortable with his life as a gay male escort until the day he is hired by a premiership footballer, and finds himself falling in love.

 

But can Kyle maintain a relationship with a closeted footballer in a country where not one pro player is out? Can he go on pretending that the homophobia endemic in the game is nothing to do with him? Does he know what a relationship means, when, for him, sex has only ever been a transaction? Can he ever tell his friends – and his family – the truth?


An edgy, moving and subversive one man show laced with sharp humour tackling football’s last taboo.

Read more...
 
PDF Print E-mail
Manchester theatre reviews

How to relax in Amsterdam

How to relax in Amsterdam by John Waterhouse

At Salford Arts Theatre

Reviewed by Yvonne Cawley May 2013


If you fancy a great night out at the theatre, to indulge yourself with a good old fashioned comedy, complete with outrageously over the top characters; well you don’t want to miss out on the latest play by John Waterhouse, currently on at the Salford Arts Theatre until Saturday 25 May 2013.

 

Relaxing in Amsterdam tells the story of recently divorced Peter, who after meeting Saskia on holiday in Andalucia, decides to ‘pack up his troubles’ and arranges to stay with her for a few weeks at her apartment in Amsterdam. If sightseeing and reading were what he had in mind, then he gets a lot more than he bargained for on this trip! Not long after he arrives, pictures of Peter robbing a bank are splashed all over the local news! Hmm not helped by the fact that Saskia’s would be boyfriend is a policeman!!

 

Read more...
 
PDF Print E-mail
Manchester theatre reviews

It's not Fair! by Rhema Productions

It's not Fair! by Rhema Productions

Written by Mike Peacock, Performed by Mike & Becky Peacock

Reviewed by Simon Belt May 2014

 

This show is designed to be both an entertaining theatrical experience, and to encourage people to engage with the issue of human trafficking. The aim is to move audience members, spurring them to take action by working with human trafficking organizations & fairtrade groups. Mike and Becky Peacock, who are Rhema Productions, regularly perform in Arts Centres, Churches and Secondary Schools, so did it live up to its billing?

Read more...
 
PDF Print E-mail
Manchester theatre reviews

Female Transport at 3MT

Female Transport by Steve Gooch

Presented by Stone Jetty Productions at 3MT

Reviewed by Simon Belt May 2013

 

It seems that I'm living through a popular revival or at least a fairly popular reworking of second-wave feminism - and theatre and the performaning arts is in no way behind the door or outside of this trend. The Three Minute Theatre in Manchester's Northern Quarter is giving special focus to female artists this year. And so it is quite fitting for 3MT to invite Sarah Wilkinson of Stone Jetty Productions to present her own production of Female Transport, written by Steve Gooch and first performed at the Half Moon Theatre, London in November 1973, marking its 40th anniversary.

 

Female Transport is set in the harsh times of 1807 on a convict ship, and focusses on six women convicts - Winnie, Madge, Pitty, Charlotte, Nance and Sarah as they are transported to work camps in Australia, brutally managed by their imposing jailer Sarge (Nick Cornwall). 

Read more...
 
PDF Print E-mail
Manchester theatre reviews

Heather Phoenix, Paul Webster and Christopher Wilkinson

Sugar Daddies by Alan Ayckbourn

Produced by Oldham Coliseum and Harrogate Theatre

Reviewed by Helen Nugent March 2013

 

Alan Ayckbourn has written 77 plays but, until last night, I hadn’t seen any of them. As a theatre buff, I almost hesitate to make this admission; it’s a bit like a movie fan saying they’ve never watched a Bond film. Or a bookworm conceding they’ve yet to pick up Dickens.

Read more...
 
PDF Print E-mail
Manchester theatre reviews

Atticus Finch (Nigel Cooke) and Scout Finch (Shannon Tarbet). Photo by Jonathan Keenan

To Kill a Mockingbird at Royal Exchange

Adapted by Christopher Sergel, Directed by Max Webster, Designed by James Cotterill

Reviewed by Jane Turner February 2013


"It's a sin to kill a Mockingbird, they provide pleasure with their songs and never harm another living creature”, symbolizing the moral of this tale, that it is wrong to kill the innocent and harmless.

 

Read more...
 
PDF Print E-mail
Manchester theatre reviews

David Copperfield at Oldham Coliseum

David Copperfield by Charles Dickens

Adapted by Alastair Cording, Directed by Kevin Shaw, at Oldham Coliseum

Reviewed by Simon Belt and Yvonne Cawley February 2013

 

This was our first visit to the Oldham Coliseum, despite it being in the back of our mind to go sometime - and what a delightful experience it was! From the convivial and relaxed welcoming reception of box office, ushers and bar staff to the familiar faces from the northern soaps sat next to us in the bar chatting freely with those around. No pretence and a down to earth directness you expect in Oldham, and just being part of an extended family of theatre goers and doers. The brochure references supporters and volunteers and this really does permeate the mood around the foyer and bar.

 

Notably spacious, the auditorium has really comfy seating, with plenty of leg-room and something also commented on by the people behind us (in the stalls). It transpires that they were installed last year which just adds to the experience, and even just a few rows from the stage we didn’t have to crane our necks to look at the stage as is sometimes the case in theatres. The acoustics were great too - just there when they were needed without ever thinking about them, indicating some elegant delivery which doesn't distract from the focus of the stage.

Read more...
 
PDF Print E-mail
Manchester theatre reviews

The Accrington Pals

THE ACCRINGTON PALS By Peter Whelan

Performed at Royal Exchange, Directed by James DacreDesigned by Jonathan Fensom

Reviewed by Emma Short January 2013

 

Using the fond template and rich underpinnings of northern childhood memories Peter Whelan brings to life the stories of the men and women of Accrington during the push for volunteer recruits for the Somme offensives during World War I. Like many northern communities at the time, such as in Liverpool and Sheffield, it saw its young men go off to fight in Kitchener's Army, side by side with their pals to fight for King and Country, patriotic and motivated to do the right thing.

 

The first major action of the battalion known as the Accrington Pals, the attack on Serre on 1st July 1916, saw them suffer devastating losses, culminating in the deaths of almost a whole generation of young men that never returned. Out of around 720 of the Accrington Pals that enrolled 583 were killed, missing or wounded. The play brings to life the reality of these events and those leading up to them. It also follows the stories of the women of Accrington in their supporting roles, their newfound work roles, how they adjusted, and their desperate struggle to find out about their fighting men.

Read more...
 
<< Start < Prev 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Next > End >>

Page 14 of 22
Join the Salon Email List
Youtube Video of discussion on Energy
RSS Feed for discussions
Manchester Salon Facebook Group
Manchester Salon Facebook Page
Manchester Salon on Twitter